Dorchester

Dorchester, Boston's largest neighborhood, is also one of its most diverse. Long-time residents mingle with newer immigrants from Ireland, Vietnam, and Cape Verde. The nation's first Vietnamese Community Center is located in Fields Corner, the heart of the Vietnamese community in Boston. Dorchester Avenue anchors the neighborhood business district with a unique mix of ethnic restaurants, beauty salons, electronics stores, and pharmacies. Franklin Park, considered the "crown jewel" of Frederick Law Olmsted's Emerald Necklace Park System, is located here. The Park features 527 acres of green space and walking paths, a zoo, and an 18-hole municipal golf course. Neighborhood pride is strong in Dorchester, as former residents have been known to wear T-shirts proclaiming "OFD" - "Originally From Dorchester." Bordered by the Neponset River and Boston Harbor, Dorchester residents enjoy the riverfront amenities of Pope John Paul II Park as well as harbor beaches and boating opportunities.


Exploring the Neighborhood

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Calendar

Videos & Multimedia »


  • May Olympic Public Meeting
    John Fitzgerald and Rich Davey answer questions at the Cleveland Community Center in Dorcherster regarding Boston 2024.Watch Video »
  • Boston Public Improvement Commission Hearings 5-14-15
    The Boston Public Improvement Commission (PIC) is the owner and regulator of the City's rights of way. The PIC plays an integral role in the City's development and permitting process. From the restaurant that wants to add a seasonal cafe on the public sidewalk, to the developer who wants to construct an underground parking garage for a new housing development, or the homeowner who wants to add an architectural feature to a house that juts into the public space, each must seek approval from the PIC to have its private venture occupy public space, either permanently or on a licensed basis. Watch Video »